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The Regular Classroom-- Courses are generally one class period in length and may be introductory or comprehensive in content. Examples of introductory courses include: Introduction to Business, Introduction to Transportation, and Introduction to Graphic Communications.

The Laboratory-- Courses are designed to simulate a business or industrial setting utilizing hands-on applications of academic, career and technical studies. Courses vary in length of time offered from one to two class periods per day. Examples include Automotive Technician, Culinary Arts, and Computer-Aided Drafting.


Internships-- Courses are conducted off campus to provide training and skills through experiences in the business community. Internships are typically unpaid and last from two to three class periods. Students rotate through a variety of work stations during the school day. For example, Hospitality Services offers an internship program at a local hotel that allows students to experience a variety of career-related opportunities.

Career Preparation-- Fomerly known as Cooperative Education, courses consist of a combination of classroom instruction and paid on-the-job training. Examples include Administrative Systems, Family and Consumer Sciences, Marketing, Agriculture, and Trade and Industrial Career Preparation.

Dual Credit-- Courses allow students to take occupationally specific classes on the community college campus or the high school campus and receive credit for both college and high school. Classes are usually one to two class periods in length. Examples include Criminal Justice, Aircraft Maintenance, Plumbing, Allied Construction, Engineering CAD, Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning, and Automotive Technology.

Tech Prep-- Students enroll in a coherent sequence of college level study. Upon competion of a Tech Prep course of study, students may enroll in a community technical college with three to six hours of college credits earned toward an associate degree. Examples include Early Childhood Professions and Business Information Systems.

Job Shadowing-- A course activity whereby students spend some of their time shadowing an employee who performs a job that they are interested in exploring. Job Shadowing varies in length from one hour to one day depending upon the arrangements made with the business. Students may choose to job shadow in industries of interest.

Licensure-- Several occupations require satisfactory completion of a state test in order to receive a license in the identfied career field. Examples include cosmetologist, electricians, plumbers, and airframe and power plant mechanics.

Work-based Learning-- Courses that include as part of their curriculum hands-on experience with a local business/industry partner. Examples include career preparation, job shadowing, mentoring, and interships.

Certification-- Courses of study leading to professional certifications upon successful completion of industry-based tests. Students may test for certification while in high school. Examples include Novell, Cisco, Microsoft, Adobe, MOUS, and A+ certification for computer maintenance and repair.