Providing Effective Feedback

Feedback says to a student, “Somebody cared enough about my work to read it and think about it!”
Dr. Susan Brookhart

Big Ideas

Stacks Image 168
Feedback can be very powerful if done well and with a purpose. The power of formative feedback lies in its double-barreled approach, addressing both cognitive and motivational factors at the same time. Good feedback gives students information they need so they can understand where they are in their learning and what to do next—the cognitive factor. Once they feel they understand what to do and why, most students develop a feeling that they have control over their own learning—the motivational factor. (Brookhart, 2017)

In this area, we provide an overview on the importance of sharing goals for student learning by discussing the different components including:
  • Effective and Meaningful Feedback
  • Checking for Understanding
  • The Role of Formative Assessment in the "We Do" phase of G.R.R.

_____________________

Click on the bar below to switch between sections.

Effective and Meaningful Feedback

Overview

Stacks Image 186
The definition for feedback is commonly along the lines of, "information about reactions to a product, a person's performance of a task, etc., used as a basis for improvement." Feedback is an important component of the formative assessment process. Formative assessment gives information to teachers and students about how students are doing relative to classroom learning goals. Good feedback contains information that students can use, which means that students have to be able to hear and understand it. Students can’t hear something that’s beyond their comprehension; nor can they hear something if they are not listening or feel like it would be useless to listen. Because students’ feelings of control and self-efficacy are involved, even well-intentioned feedback can be very destructive.. (Brookhart, 2017)

When examining the G.R.R. model (see illustration to the left), think of Formative Assessment as the gear shifter that allows you to "shift up" students to the next stage or "downshift" students to a previous stage. The "clutch" of the whole system is the feedback that you get from and give to students.

In this area, we examine effective and meaningful feedback and its implications on instruction including the "Three Lenses". Click on the different tabs above to view videos and download information, strategies, and ideas.

Video

Evidence-Based Feedback

Austin's Butterfly - Formative Feedback

Formative Feedback

_____________________

Checking for Understanding (CFU)

Overview

Stacks Image 351
Fisher and Frey (2014) suggest that every phase of G.R.R. Instructional Model must be accompanied by a means of checking for understanding. In the focused instruction phase, this is often accomplished through oral and written summaries. During guided instruction, students are grouped and regrouped based on their performance, not on the teacher’s perception of their ability (course correction). The most effective guided instruction is based on formative assessment that is directly linked with content standards. Gathering formative assessment data to inform instruction means that the teacher is actively involved during the collaborative learning phase. This allows the teacher to momentarily downshift a group and then return them to the proper gear once they are back on track.

In this section, we will investigate various CFU strategies that can quickly gauge where students are at. We will also look at several technology-based resources. Finally, we will take a look at how we should record formative data in order for us to know where to shift gears and for whom. Click on the different tabs above to view videos and download information, strategies, and ideas.

Video

K20 - 5 Quick Examples of Formative Assessment

Building FAs into Game-Based Learning

Formative Checks in a Flipped Classroom

Downloads

Apps

On The Web

_____________________

The Role of Formative Assessment in the "We Do" Phase in G.R.R.

Overview

Stacks Image 354
Fisher and Frey (2014) suggest that as being part of guided instruction, "students are grouped and regrouped based on their performance, not on the teacher’s perception of their ability. The most effective guided instruction is based on formative assessment that is directly linked with content standards." Another way to think about it is formative thinking at this stage can be viewed as "misconception analysis". In other words, by keeping notes or records of which student has what misconception, it will definitely set the stage when moving forward.

In this section, we will further investigate the role of formative thinking during this stage including its relationship with prompting and cueing. Questioning will be discussed in this section. Click on the different tabs above to view videos and download information, strategies, and ideas.

Video

_____________________