Encouraging Self-Regulation

Teachers who promote reflective classrooms ensure that students are fully engaged in the process of making meaning. They organize instruction so that students are the producers, not just the consumers, of knowledge. To best guide children in the habits of reflection, these teachers approach their role as that of “facilitator of meaning making.”
Arthur L. Costa

Big Ideas

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Self-Regulation is the ability to be aware of one's own thoughts and actions during any type of process. We can facilitate self-regulation through a variety of means including modeling, making learning meaningful, working together in a team where everyone holds each other accountable, and self-reflection. Reflecting on experiences encourages insight and complex learning. We foster our own growth when we control our learning, so some reflection is best done alone. Reflection is also enhanced, however, when we ponder our learning with others.Reflection involves linking a current experience to previous learnings (a process called scaffolding). Reflection also involves drawing forth cognitive and emotional information from several sources: visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and tactile. To reflect, we must act upon and process the information, synthesizing and evaluating the data. In the end, reflecting also means applying what we've learned to contexts beyond the original situations in which we learned something (Costa & Kallick, 2008)

In this section, we will discuss:

  • Collaborative Learning
  • Student to Student Feedback
  • Student Self-Regulation
  • "You Do It Together" in G.R.R.
  • "You Do It Yourself" in G.R.R.

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Collaborative Learning

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Overview

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Cooperative learning is an approach to create classroom activities that are academic and social learning experiences. Students must work in groups to complete tasks collectively toward academic goals. Students learning cooperatively can capitalize on one another's resources and skills to accomplish such goals. Finally, the role of the teacher changes from being the source of information to becoming a facilitator of student learning.



Built within cooperative learning are seven keys to success:
  • Structures
  • Teams
  • Management
  • Classbuilding
  • Teambuilding
  • Social Skills
  • Basic Principles
(Kagan, 2009)

In this section, we will examine the seven keys of and the use of student contracts in learning. Click on the different tabs above to view videos and download information, strategies, and ideas.

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Student to Student Feedback

Overview

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Student to student feedback without structures in place can lead to misconceptions being confirmed between those conducting and receiving the feedback. Hattie (2012) suggest structures such as providing:

  • What is Accountable Talk and How Does It Work?
  • Providing sentence stems to use when providing feedback to peers
  • Divide types of feedback into three different levels including task, process, and self regulation.
  • Positive-achievement focused classroom culture

In this section, we will examine the positive effects of peer feedback and how to create structures that allow students to provide effective feedback to each other thus allowing the development of self-regulation. Click on the different tabs above to view videos and download information, strategies, and ideas.

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Student Self Regulation

Overview

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Fisher and Frey (2012) suggest that the act of self-regulation involves, "acting upon the metacognitive perceptions they experience during a task, such as rereading a passage when comprehension breaks down, consulting another resource to clarify the meaning of a vaguely understood vocabulary term, or checking one’s work for errors after completion. These metacognitive behaviors are linked to the learner’s intentions and goals, such as finishing the task, doing it well, and receiving positive feedback.

In this section, we will discuss self-regulating behaviors such as time management, task prioritization, and calibration. We will also investigate tools to encourage self-regulation such as standards trackers, student portfolios, and self-progress reports. Click on the different tabs above to view videos and download information, strategies, and ideas.

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You Do It Together in G.R.R.

Overview

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Fisher and Frey (2014) suggest the use of Collaborative Learning over the traditional version of Cooperative Learning when facilitating the "You Do Together" stage of G.R.R. Collaborative learning is different from cooperative learning in two important ways. The first is that the task design itself is more broadly defined, and it may be tightly or loosely structured, as in problem-based learning. The second is that the teacher plays an instrumental role in the task. Rather than simply monitoring group progress and managing the classroom organization, the teacher steps in and out of the group to engage in guided instruction. In other words, whereas the emphasis in cooperative learning is on the social processes used by the group, collaborative learning focuses on the cognitive and metacognitive nature of the learning that occurs within the group.

In this area, we will investigate the structures of collaborative learning and the instructional routings of this stage of G.R.R. Click on the different tabs above to view videos and download information, strategies, and ideas.

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You Do It Yourself in G.R.R.

Overview

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When thinking about Independent Practice, we may recall mountains of homework and hours of navigation without the benefit of having a teacher to clarify and guide. Fisher and Frey (2012) discuss this by explaining the, "common misconception about independent learning is that the ultimate goal is for the student to replicate what has been taught. But independent learning is far more complex than that. The process of figuring things out, which begins during focused instruction, continues. Struggle is essential for learning; expecting that students should somehow be “perfect” by the time they reach the independent learning phase isn’t setting the bar high enough."

Even within the realm of independent work, formative assessment plays a key role. In this section, we will explore the skills and conditions of effective independent work implementation and how the role of the student and teacher changes during this stage. Click on the different tabs above to view videos and download information, strategies, and ideas.

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